Every November, people looking to unload or stock up on their supply of dead and injured horses gallop to the Delaware County Fairgrounds.

For auction organizer Timothy Blentelneck, the event is a wonderful tradition that officially marks the start of the winter and Thanksgiving season.

“It’s a fabulous yearly ritual in which horse owners can salvage some money from their horses that either died or had an accident during the year,” Blentelneck said. “It is also a great chance for aspiring horse owners to get some experience caring for horses without shelling out a lot of money. If you can’t care for an injured horse, you have no business owning a healthy horse. And if you can’t care for a dead horse, you have no business living on this planet.”

Animal rights advocate Melanie Halterbottom said the practice of selling injured and dead horses is disgusting, and doesn’t serve the purposes that organizers purport it does.

“I happen to know that at least 95 percent of people buying these dead and injured horses have no interest in learning how to care for a healthy horse,” Halterbottom said. “Most of the injured horses are brought home and tortured by teenage children, which are the main consumers in this auction by the way. And the dead horses are almost exclusively used for a unique Thanksgiving dinner dishes, including filet 0′ filly, pony pie, cream of colt, and steed potato casserole.”

Marion businessman and horse devouring enthusiast Bill Gilligan said there is nothing wrong with enjoying horse meat on Thanksgiving, or any other day of the week.

“2,657 horses die every 10 seconds in the United States, and most of them either rot in the field or are used as household decorations in Montana,” Gilligan said. “I consider myself a new age Native American. They used every part of the buffalo, I use every part of the horse. On Thanksgiving, for example, I fashion the mane of the horse into a fabulous hat. The four hooves are hidden around the house for the children to find. Each child that finds a hoof gets one cup of premium mare-inara sauce. We make bronco butter, ‘chicken’ naglets, and sweet and sour stallion. Everything is covered in horseradish sauce. It’s a great day.”

Blentelneck said he does not have an opinion on equine dining.

“Look, I’m not here to tell you what to do with your dead or injured horse once you’ve bought it,” Blentelneck said. “The last time I checked, this was still America, even with that Kenyan prince running things.”

At the end of the day on Thursday, 7,510 injured horses found new owners, and 10,056 dead horses found new homes.

 

17 COMMENTS

    • Shame Shame on the people that buy and eat these horses….I am a horse owner. I hunt ,fish,camp and love my animals. This is such an outrage and so sick…Speaking of sick I hope they do get sick on it…Shut down that auction. We have a tac/horse auction here. I have purchased a few of my best friends(horses) there. but we would never think of doing such a thing in our town………..again shame shame shame on you people

  1. Sweet Jesus people! This is a fu%king fake newspaper…. go to the nearest mirror and punch yourself in the fuc^ing face. If I was a midget I would come over to your houses and fist #uck your faces myself! Learn to laugh jerkoff$

    • I found this article on a Massachusetts Equine rescue page and had no idea it was fake. I figured it was on their page it was real. That is why you really have to investigate what you post before you post it.

      • I work for the company… the horses are well card for… a vet checks all animals coming and going.. they are sulky race horses standardbread and thuroughbread mainly… but at best in a November sale the have 1300 go through.. I once got a horse with strangers (an infection in the lower jaw) refused to take him to the ring reported it to a stall manager and without owners consent the horses was treated by the vet and a bill was issued, did not go to the sale… this article is fake… I bust my ass 4 times a year at the sale meet wonderful people and beautiful animals… he’ll this past year I handled 4 babies all siblings of the 2016 Kentucky derby winner and the cheapest one sold for 9500 dollars

  2. Who in the hell eats horse meat in this countery? Some redneck yahoo? In the West, they may be considdred much more so as livestock, but horses have fast become “companion animals,” those that can be ridden, worked and compete with, to enjoy with the family and kids… They DO NOT use horse meat in dog foods in this country. Perhaps they try to sell it overseas or in Quebec, Canada. The way in which we find it disgusting for some Koreans, Chinese, or Vietnamese to eat dog or cat meat is the way many of us feel about someone consuming horse meat. Our country was founded in part with the horse in hand — as the horse of the Native Americans, the true Americans, And, by the savage conquistators, by the farmer and rancher… If you can’t afford a horse or to provide it with humane veterinary care when it’s ill or down, or havew the skillsets of a vet tech, then do us all a favor and don’t own horses. Keep the humanity in man.

  3. I have bought quite a few dead and injured horses at this sale and it is always first rate. One year, we were having an issue loading one of the dead ones and the winch cable tore the horse’s head off and the auction folks helped me and my family get the ‘parts’ onto the trailer. Special thanks to Zed, Israel and Chuckie – always great to have good help. We are looking forward to next years’ auction. Surprisingly, the nachos and other food is quite good as well.

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